Signal Charlie

Dedicated to the continuous improvement of aerospace safety

Top Ten CFI-I Tricks of the Trade

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I pulled this list from the May issue of IFR magazine. The article discusses esssential tips and tricks for IFR flying. Good advice for everyone, I think.

1. Know how to operate within the IFR system, what/who/when to ask questions and gather information.

2. Know your equipment.

3. Seek understanding, knowledge and avoid “crutches”.

4. Watch you track.

5. Don’t believe one needle (aka trust but verify).

6. Utilize CRM to build SA.

7. Fly in actual IMC. Use building block approach, conservative go/no-go criteria and/or CFI-I.

8. Practice IMC to VMC transitions to land.

9. Learn Control and Performance method of flying. Power, Attitude, Trim.

10. Keep a positive mental attitude of continuous learning and applied wisdom.

Check out IFR

Fly Smart

Clark

Written by Clark

May 9, 2007 at 9:32 pm

Safety Management System (SMS) Overview

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I have created a presentation that will introduce safety practitioners
to the basics of Safety Management Systems (SMS).
We are front line aviation safety advocates.
We have a principal stake in improving the management of safety,
reducing the accident rate and driving down mishap costs.
We can do this by taking a quality approach to safety.

Check out SMS Overview
This is a Level Zero Overview and Outreach effort, meant as an introduction and guide to your own personal SMS.

Fly Smart

Clark

Written by Clark

April 20, 2007 at 10:50 pm

Factores Humanos

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INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS FOR FLIGHT SAFETY AND HUMAN FACTORS
Cordoba, Argentina
May 10-12 2007

Por primera vez en Argentina se realizará un Congreso de Seguridad Aérea y
Factores Humanos en la Aviación con un nutrido y reconocido equipo de
disertantes que estarán presentes en Córdoba.

La capacitación y la toma de conciencia debe ser prioritario para
encaminarnos hacia los cambios pretendidos.

Su presencia en este Congreso será el primer paso hacia un cambio profundo
en la forma de actuar y dirigir utilizando métodos de probada eficiencia.

El equipo de profesionales estará a vuestra disposición para trasmitir sus
vivencias y experiencia en cada una de las áreas especificas.

Agradecemos a las empresas y organismos que con su aporte hacen posible la
realización de este Congreso.

Lo invitamos a visitar nuestra página http://www.cisafha.com.ar , sumarse a este
esfuerzo, concurrir y participar de esta rica experiencia.

T  R  MMR
Total Resource Management MR
CRM+Factores Humanos+Seguridad+Manejo del Riesgo+Calidad

Concepto integral para la verdadera reducción del error humano en aviación
(MR)

http://www.factoreshumanos.com

info@factoreshumanos.com

mosca elegante

Luis

Written by Clark

April 20, 2007 at 6:45 pm

Posted in Human Factors

New “WINGS” Pilot Proficiency Program

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FYI

FAASTeam   FAASTeam News Release
Contact: James E. Pyles, National FAASTeam Outreach Program Manager
Posted On: April 11, 2007 The All New WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program . . . it’s no longer an “Award” program but a true proficiency program designed to help improve our skills and knowledge as pilots.

The All New “WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program”
by: James E. Pyles, National FAASTeam Outreach Manager

Regular proficiency training is essential to the safety of all pilots and their passengers. Each pilot must take a personal interest in their safety and that of their passengers. The WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program is designed to help each pilot construct an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It encourages pilots to continue their aviation educational pursuits and requires education, review, and flight proficiency in the Areas of Operation found in current Practical Test Standards (PTS) that correspond with the leading accident causal factors in the United States. Further, the program encourages participation of FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Industry Members to establish regular recurrent training programs within their organizations and areas of influence to help all pilots reach their highest potential and maintain a high level of safety and proficiency.

While the program is still in its final stages of development and final details are not yet releasable here are a few informational items about the new WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program:

  •  Three Phases; Basic, Advanced, Master
  •  Those maintaining the proficiency requirements for the Basic phase need not accomplish the flight review requirements of 14 CFR part 61
  •  Flight Review date “moves” with you as long as you continue to maintain at least a Basic phase / level
  •  Progress tracked on FAASafety.gov
  •  Curriculum and Syllabi are designed from Practical Test Standards
  •  Credits not based on time but on showing proficiency to applicable practical test standards
  •  Designed to promote development of year-round training and contact with authorized instructors
  •  Curriculum and syllabi for all pilots holding a U.S. pilot certificate
  •  Industry encouraged to provide incentives awarding pilots for their participation in the program
  •  Special emphasis on incident and accident causal factor areas of operation
  •  Flexibility in requirements and subject areas allow for maximum effectiveness of program for each pilot no matter what kind of flight activities they conduct
  •  Requirements include both knowledge and flight
  •  Certificate, wallet card, and transcripts are downloadable and printable right from FAASafety.gov
  •  For a very limited time pilots may earn credit for both the new program and sun-setting award program
  •  Target nationwide launch date is June

As you can see it’s no longer an “Award” program but a true proficiency program designed to help improve our skills and knowledge as pilots. Watch for more information to be released about the WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program on the FAASTeam’s FAASafety.gov internet site.

James E. Pyles
National FAASTeam Outreach Manager (NFOM)
801-257-5071

 

Fly Smart

Clark

Written by Clark

April 17, 2007 at 5:32 pm

Boundaries and Centers

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I am reading Asaf Degani’s book Taming HAL, a discussion of human interaction with automation. One thing I have observed is that the foundation of a good safety management system is clear, defined boundaries of operating envelopes.  Our body and our aircraft have limits, and while we can perform at the edges of these limits,  doing so effectively removes any margin for error (envelope protection). Aviation is a dynamic, complex environment subject to multiple influences, but the system is designed to handle one change at a time. It is not designed to handle compound emergencies, and automation does not have the creative problem-solving skills that we possess. Automation is great at doing one thing, don’t ask it to do two, and don’t push it past the edge.

So let’s think about it before we go. Takeoffs are optional, landings are not. Operating away from a safe center begins to strip away defenses and leave no room for human or machine to recover. Let’s be sure we fully understand our capabilities and limitations (our machine’s too) and operate conservatively.

 Fly Smart

Kent

Written by Clark

April 15, 2007 at 7:30 pm

Time Management

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Get things quicker on the ground and leave more time for the fun stuff…flying!

Lifehack

Written by Clark

April 15, 2007 at 7:01 pm

P-3 Recovery

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How many AN-124s does it take to fly a P-3 out of China?

P-3 Recovery

AN-124 and EP-3

Fly Smart…and watch out for China…

Clark

Written by Clark

April 9, 2007 at 8:08 pm

Flying Safety for Dummies

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Don’t go flying if the birds are walking.

Try sailing.

If there’s no wind, row. Or head to the airport.

Clark

Written by Clark

April 6, 2007 at 10:24 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Defensive Posturing

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The main hazard during flight training (or any flying for that matter) is letting the aircraft get to an unrecoverable state, and the way to prevent that is defensive posturing. Defensive posturing is the mental attitude and associated physical actions that ensure that an aircraft never reaches an undesired state. Maintaining a defensive posture to manage threat and error is the key to flying smart.

Read Kent Lewis’ Article on Defensive Posturing.
https://i0.wp.com/www.signalcharlie.net/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/school1_small.jpg
Special thanks to Barbara and David Mikkelson and Snopes for the amazing photos and story behind them.

Written by Clark

April 6, 2007 at 12:20 pm

Vintage Flying Museum

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ChuckieChuckie is the Vintage Flying Museum B-17, and her namesake is a fantastic aviation safety advocate. Chuckie could not fly without teamwork, one of the hallmarks of system safety.

Vintage Flying Museum

Written by Clark

April 4, 2007 at 8:51 am

Posted in Aviation History